Natural Law and the Two Kingdoms (Part III)

In case you just tuned in, this is part III of a brief review of David VanDrunen's book, Natural Law and the Two Kingdoms. The other two posts immediately precede this one. In chapters 4-7 VanDrunen treks through the English and European post-reformation eras, into the early American scene (New England and Virgina), back to  Europe (specifically Holland) and… Continue reading Natural Law and the Two Kingdoms (Part III)

Natural Law and the Two Kingdoms: Brief Review Part II

Yesterday, I introduced this great addition to Reformed theological studies: David VanDrunen's Natural Law and the Two Kingdoms (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2010).  Today, I'll briefly point out a few highlights of chapters 2-3. In chapter two, VanDrunen argues that "The doctrines of natural law and the two kingdoms in the Reformed tradition did not spring from… Continue reading Natural Law and the Two Kingdoms: Brief Review Part II

Natural Law and Two Kingdoms in Reformed History

When I was in college, I had a class on "spiritual formation" that was basically a huge dose of medieval mysticism with just a touch of English puritanism.  (I've wondered since then if this teacher of mine knew what the English Puritans said about Rome!)  Since the class was de-forming my "spirituality" (I did NOT… Continue reading Natural Law and Two Kingdoms in Reformed History

Ursinus and Brakel on the Law of Nature

I'm having an unofficial contest with Scott Clark (though he may not be aware of it!).  I'll see his Olevian and raise him two: Ursinus and Brakel: "The natural law, the knowledge of general principles known to men, the difference between things honest and base, engraven upon our hearts, teach that there is a providence:… Continue reading Ursinus and Brakel on the Law of Nature