He Calls You So Graciously (Zwingli)

Huldreich (Ulrich) Zwingli, the Swiss Reformer, was born in 1484, the same year as the German Reformer, Martin Luther. Zwingli is often known today for his memorialist view of the Lord's Supper. However, there's a lot more to Zwingli's labors and teaching than a certain view of the Supper. He did clearly preach the truths… Continue reading He Calls You So Graciously (Zwingli)

Thick Monastery Walls (Kuyper)

 Sometimes Christians think retreating from the world will benefit their spiritual life.  They believe that withdrawing from the world will help them get closer to God.  This is most obviously seen in the monastic movement that dates back to the early church.  There are several biblical reasons why the monastic impulse is not a good… Continue reading Thick Monastery Walls (Kuyper)

Prayer: Often, Short, Strong (Luther)

  Martin Luther was quick to point out the spiritual abuses and unbiblical practices in many monasteries of his day.  In his commentary on the Sermon on the Mount, specifically Matthew 6:7-13, Luther noted how many monks thought of prayer as a work: Therefore they have themselves said that there is no harder work than… Continue reading Prayer: Often, Short, Strong (Luther)

Monks, Hermits, and the Devil’s Deception (Luther)

At one time in his life, Martin Luther was a monk in the Augustinian order, a strict branch of monasticism that emphasized separation from the world and vigorous spiritual disciplines.  However, after discovering the freedom of the gospel, Luther stopped living a monastic life because he found his righteousness and salvation in Christ, not in… Continue reading Monks, Hermits, and the Devil’s Deception (Luther)

Dr. Martin on Monastic Futility

  Some Christians today unfortunately have a positive view of monasticism or monastic retreats; many of them view such things as very “spiritual” and pleasing to God.  Martin Luther, however, rightly rebuked such a view.  Having spent time in a monastery, Luther spoke first hand.  This excerpt that follows has a lot to do with… Continue reading Dr. Martin on Monastic Futility