“Receiving” in Article IV of The Apology of the Augsburg Confession

Article IV of the Apology of the Augsburg Confession (1531) uses the terms "receive" or "received" (etc.) well over thirty times (I lost count!). This is very significant because Article IV is on justification sola fide. I don't have time and space to explain all the details here and now, but this article uses the… Continue reading “Receiving” in Article IV of The Apology of the Augsburg Confession

The Lutheran Confessions: Concordia

  (This is a re-blog from November 2009) Concordia is an outstanding Reformation resource.  It is handsome, sturdy, well-formatted, and easy to use.  The subtitle is correct: it is A Reader's Edition of the Book of Concord.  Editorial props go to Paul McCain, Edward Englebrecht, Robert Baker, and Gene Veith as well as Concordia Publishing House for a… Continue reading The Lutheran Confessions: Concordia

The Formula of Concord and the Third Use of the Law

Even though I disagree with several aspects of Lutheran theology, I’ve found some brilliant Christian statements in the Lutheran confessions.  I love the emphasis on Christian liberty, vocation, the five solas, and the penetrating critiques of the papacy and fanaticism (i.e. the Anabaptists).  In my opinion, one of the most incredible and remarkable statements is… Continue reading The Formula of Concord and the Third Use of the Law

The Formula of Concord on Justification Sola Fide

 For me, one of the most debilitating aspects of moralistic theology is the way works sneak in the back door of justification.  One can see this open "back door" in the New Perspectives on Paul, the Federal Vision, and some Arminian evangelicalism. In sharp contrast to this moralistic theology, I love this reformation statement on justification sola fide from… Continue reading The Formula of Concord on Justification Sola Fide

Making a Christ Out of Our Faithfulness

On this blog before, I've mentioned quite a bit how important it is to distinguish between the law and the gospel.   This was a huge part of the Reformation, from Luther to Calvin to Ursinus to Olevian forward to Turretin and Poole and ahead to Bavinck and others.  What does it look like when you blend the law… Continue reading Making a Christ Out of Our Faithfulness