No Creeds! (Except What Celebrity Preacher Says)

  “The study of the religious convictions of self-taught Americans in the early years of the republic reveals how much weight was placed on private judgment and how little on the roles of history, theology, and the collective will of the church.” So writes Nathan Hatch in his assessment of American religion in his excellent… Continue reading No Creeds! (Except What Celebrity Preacher Says)

Sola Scriptura, Creeds, and Confessions

From Wittenberg to Geneva to London, the Reformers stressed the centrality and authority of Holy Scripture.  They argued from Scripture that Scripture alone is God’s necessary Word to us for our salvation and for living the Christian life.  However, the Reformers also stressed the need for and importance of creeds and confessions.  In other words,… Continue reading Sola Scriptura, Creeds, and Confessions

The Brilliant Ambiguity of the Westminster Standards

Confessions and creeds are useful tools and teachers for Christians who want guidance for standing firm in the faith.  Sadly, some people view Reformed creeds and confessions as straightjackets or paper popes that bind and restrict Christians in  many ways.  However, the Reformed confessions and creeds are purposely ambiguous on certain doctrines; this allows for… Continue reading The Brilliant Ambiguity of the Westminster Standards

Why Christians Need Confessions

  What good are confessions in a church?  Or, in other words, biblical confessions are a blessing for the church and the Christian.  But how?1) Confessions delimit church power.  …This is what stops churches from becoming cults: clear and open statements about where church authority begins and ends, connected to transparent processes of exercising that… Continue reading Why Christians Need Confessions

Wright, Reformation, and Gospel

I’ve found Cornelis Venema’s The Gospel of Free Acceptance in Christ to be a great Reformed resource for interacting with recent revisions of justification as found in the New Perspectives on Paul.  Venema’s chapter describing N. T. Wright’s perspective on Paul is especially helpful, clear, and fair.  As I read this chapter (5), I tried… Continue reading Wright, Reformation, and Gospel