Romans 12-13 and Christian Living

I really appreciate G. P. Waters’ summary of Romans 12:1-13:14 in A Biblical-Theological Introduction to the New Testament. After he goes through the earlier themes of Romans, he comes to Romans 12 and well explains its place in the epistle. Here’s a portion of what Waters wrote - I think it’ll be helpful for others …

The God of the Mundane

To bring God glory and honor, the Christian doesn’t have to change the world or do all sorts of spectacular things for the good of the Kingdom.  A follower of Christ can serve the Lord well in an obscure, behind-the-scenes, everyday manner (whether trimming lawns or teaching driver’s education).  Christians can please God without ever …

A Maid Is More Godly Than A Monk

Dear Christian: You don’t have to go into full- or part-time ministry to please God.  You don’t have to go on a mission trip or undergo some monastic retreat experience to bring God glory.  You can bring him glory by doing your daily tasks with a heart of love for the Lord and hand of …

Two (and a Half) New Don Carson Titles

This one is just out: Don Carson's Collected Writings on Scripture (Wheaton: Crossway, 2010).  It looks just as promising as most of his other writings.  The first 190 pages or so are essays of Carson's that discuss the Bible: historiography, literary aspects, hermeneutics, criticism, authority, theology, and other such themes.  The second half of the …

Mortification

Though I'm not a big fan of archaic language, I love the old theological term "mortification."  I've mentioned this before and I think it is important to keep coming back to: putting to death the sin that is still in us (i.e. Rom 8.13b).  Along these lines, John Owen's discussions of mortification are always helpful.  …

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