On Calvinists, Conflict, and Controversy (Newton)

There are some areas of the Christian faith that are not matters of chief importance.  They are important, but not essentially or fundamentally important.  For example, there are different views of Christian schooling, different views of the elements of the Lord’s Supper (grape juice or wine), different views of how deacons should function in a… Continue reading On Calvinists, Conflict, and Controversy (Newton)

Critical Calvinists and Pride (Hughes, Bridges)

  One thing I've noticed over the years is the fact that some Calvinists are also very critical of others.  I know that some people in general are critical by nature, but to me it seems worse when someone who holds to the doctrines of grace is always super critical about others.  Maybe you've seen it:… Continue reading Critical Calvinists and Pride (Hughes, Bridges)

He Does Really and Actually Save!

What does Reformed theology teach about the extent of Christ's atonement?  Francis Turretin (d. 1687) explained definite atonement well: "The common opinion of the Reformed is that Christ - from the mere good pleasure of the Father - was appointed and given as a Redeemer and head, not to all men, but to a certain… Continue reading He Does Really and Actually Save!

Unconditional Election: A Motive to Missions

 Sometimes people say that the doctrines of grace (aka Calvinism) are a hinderance to missions and evangelism.  The reasoning goes like this: why share the gospel with someone if he might not be elect?  Why share the gospel with someone if Jesus didn't die for him?  While hypercalvinists might say "Good point!" to those questions, biblical Calvinists answer… Continue reading Unconditional Election: A Motive to Missions

Definite Atonement, Particular Redemption

For me, one of the most comforting doctrines of grace is the biblical teaching that Christ's death actually accomplished salvation for his people.  In other words, Jesus' atoning death didn't merely make salvation possible - it actually saved people from sin and misery.  In Calvinism this is called 'limited atonement,' though I prefer the terms… Continue reading Definite Atonement, Particular Redemption