The Intent(s) of the Divine and Human Writers

Another great quote by Michael Horton: In scriptural discourse the original human author may never have intended his or her words to be put to use in later, often quite distanciated, contexts, but the divine speaker is doing just that.  Thus, the story of deliverance from Egypt through the Red Sea becomes not only a… Continue reading The Intent(s) of the Divine and Human Writers

Abraham Kuyper on Scripture, Part 3

This post stands in line with a couple of posts I did over a year ago (Here and Here). In his The Work of the Holy Spirit, Abraham Kuyper notes that the biblical writers did not wait to start writing scripture until redemption had been fully accomplished and revelation had been fully received.  Rather, revelation… Continue reading Abraham Kuyper on Scripture, Part 3

Abraham Kuyper on Scripture, Part 2

This is a continuation of material from the previous post on Kuyper’s approach to the inspiration of God’s word. Although the Holy Spirit spoke directly to men, human speech and language being no human inventions, yet in writing He employed human agencies.  But whether He dictates directly, as in the Revelation of St. John, or… Continue reading Abraham Kuyper on Scripture, Part 2

Abraham Kuyper on Scripture, Part 1

I was struck by what Abraham Kuyper had to say about the features of the Biblical text and the inspiration of scripture.  The more I read by the Amsterdam theologians, I’m intrigued by their open-mindedness to certain trajectories in biblical studies (especially in the late 1800's to early 1900's when critical studies were much less… Continue reading Abraham Kuyper on Scripture, Part 1