Pride and Loving to Hear the Self Talk (Bernard)

7D78CC05-EC15-43DE-B3A5-6061C54DD524 In his treatise on the steps of humility and pride, Bernard does a good job of explaining how pride and the love of hearing the self talk go hand in hand.   What was true in the 12th century is true today.  Do you know anyone who likes to hear himself or herself talk too much?  Here’s Bernard’s explanation:

“For he is full of talk and the spirit is straining to get out (Jb 32:18). He hungers and thirsts for listeners to whom he can make empty boasts, to whom he can pour out all he feels, and whom he can tell what he is and how great he is.

He finds an occasion to speak. Let us say the subject is literature. He says new things and old (Mt 13:52). His opinions fly about. His words tumble over one another. He butts in before he is asked. He does not answer other people’s questions. He asks the questions himself and he answers them, and he cuts off anyone who tries to speak. When the bell rings for the end of the discussion, even though it has been a long one, he asks for a little more time. He asks permission to come back to the stories later, not so as to edify anyone, but so that he can show off his knowledge (1 Cor 8:1).

He may say something edifying, but that is not his intention. He does not care for you to teach, or to learn from you what he himself does not know, but that others should know how much he knows.

If the subject is religion, at once he has dreams and visions to offer. Then he praises fasting, commends vigils, enthuses above all about prayer. He discusses patience, humility, and all the other virtues at great length, but in utter emptiness. Yet if you were to hear him you would say that he “speaks from the fullness of his heart” (Mt 12:34), or “A good man brings forth good things from his good treasure” (Mt 12:35).

If the talk turns to lighter things, he is discovered to be even more talkative, because this is something he really knows about. You would say if you heard him that his mouth was a stream of vanity, a river of scurrility (vulgarity), so that he stirs even solemn and grave minds to merriment. And to cut a long story short, “When there is much talk there is boasting” (Prv 10:19). Here you have the fourth step described and named. Avoid the thing but remember the name.”

The quote can be found in the Selected Works of Bernard of Clairvaux, page 133.

Shane Lems
Hammond WI

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