The Bible and the Doctrine of Sin (Hodge)

The Way of Life by [Hodge, Charles] If you read Scripture and take it seriously, you cannot get around what it teaches about the sinfulness of man.  Here’s how Charles Hodge explained it:

[The doctrine of sin] is not a doctrine taught in isolated passages. It is one of those fundamental truths which are taken for granted in almost every page of the Bible. The whole scheme of redemption supposes that man is a fallen being. Christ came to seek and to save the lost. He was announced as the Savior of sinners. His advent and work have no meaning or value but upon the assumption that we are guilty, for he came to save his people from their sins; to die the just for the unjust; to bear our sins in his own body on the tree. Those who have no sin, need no Savior; those who do not deserve death, need no Redeemer. As the doctrine of redemption pervades the Scripture, so does the doctrine of the universal sinfulness of men.

This doctrine is also assumed in all the Scriptural representations of what is necessary for admission into heaven. All men, everywhere, are commanded to repent. But repentance supposes sin. Every man must be born again, in order to see the kingdom of God; he must become a new creature; he must be renewed after the image of God. Being dead in trespasses and in sins, he must be quickened, or made partaker of a spiritual life. In short it is the uniform doctrine of the Bible, that all men need both pardon and sanctification in order to their admission to heaven. It therefore teaches that all men are sinners.

This quote is found in Hodge’s The Way of Life, chapter two.  (And, if you’re interested, it’s only $0.99 right now on Kindle!!)

Shane Lems
Covenant Presbyterian Church (OPC)
Hammond, WI, 54015