Broken?

David Wells did a nice job of explaining and critiquing postmodern spirituality in the first chapter of Losing Our Virtue.  At one point he says that postmodern spirituality doesn’t really talk about sins in moral terms but in psychological terms.  In other words, instead of talking about sin as breaking God’s law, disobeying God, and a rupture in the relationship between God and man, people talk sin by way of personal experience:

“It begins with our anxiety, pain, and disillusionment, with the world in its disorder, the family or marriage in its brokenness, or the workplace in its brutality and insecurity.  God, in consequence, is valued to the extent that he is able to bathe these wounds, assuage these insecurities, calm these fears, restore some sense of internal order, and bring some sense of wholeness.”

So in evangelicalism today you’ll notice words like broken, numb, shattered, and wounded.  Wells quotes one praise song to prove his point:

“He heard my cry and came to heal me / He took my pain and He relieved me;
He filled my life and comforted me / And his name will shine, shine eternally.”

What’s the big deal?  Why can’t we just talk about being broken and bruised instead of sinful and wretched before God?  Isn’t it OK to say we’re “numb” instead of saying “my sin is ever before me (Ps.51)?  Here’s Wells again:

“This psychologizing of sin and salvation has an immediacy about it that is appealing in this troubled age, this age of broken beliefs and broken lives.  The cost, however, is that it so subverts the process of moral understanding that sin loses its sinfulness, at least before God.  And whereas in classical spirituality it was assumed that sinners would struggle with their sin, feel its sting, and experience dismay over it, in postmodern spirituality, this struggle is considered abnormal and something for which divine relief is immediately available.  That is why the experience of Luther, Brainerd, and Owen is so remote from what passes as normal in the evangelical world today.”

This is important to note!  We have to be sure to talk about sin in biblical terms and not define sin based on psychological experiences or emotional feelings.  Sin isn’t first about our feelings, experiences, and emotions, it is first about disobeying God, doing what is evil in his sight,  falling short of his glory, and being accountable to him for it (Ps. 51, Rom. 3, etc.).  And the remedy for sin is not something that we feel or do, it is Christ crucified for sinners, doing what they could never do themselves!

David Wells, Losing Our Virtue (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998).

Shane Lems
Hammond, WI

Advertisements

3 comments on “Broken?

  1. edflores76 says:

    Hi Mike,

    This article really explains what I have been thinking for several months but it says it so much better than I could. This is why in our conversations with many other Christians there is no discussion of their struggle with sin like the old guys. The difference is between the old walk/fight of faith and pop psychology and self improvement.

    Thanks for your excellent responses, you are a truly gifted writer, love your perspectives and your conclusions. However, on one level I find it hard to relate because other than my sinfulness(the Worms in my head) I have no health or other major struggles. You faith in the face of your health issues are a great comfort to me and other believers.

    Be blessed my Brother,

    Ed

    On Tue, May 30, 2017 at 1:58 PM, The Reformed Reader wrote:

    > Reformed Reader posted: ” David Wells did a nice job of explaining and > critiquing postmodern spirituality in the first chapter of Losing Our > Virtue. At one point he says that postmodern spirituality doesn’t really > talk about sins in moral terms but in psychological terms. In ot” >

  2. […] Orthodox Presbyterian Church and serves as pastor of Covenant Presbyterian Church in Hammond, Wis. This article appeared on his blog and is used with […]

  3. Brad D Evans says:

    Shane, as a long time pastor I’ve been pondering this very issue and I think you’ve nailed it. You have framed it in a very helpful way. I’ve sensed that “something is wrong with this picture” but haven’t quite found the words for it. Now I think I have. thanks
    Brad Evans
    Coventry, Ct
    PCA.

Comments are closed.