Vigor, Exertion, Diligence, Faith

Jacket William Wilberforce’s Real Christianity is a fascinating and helpful book first published in England in 1797 (with this title: “A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians, in the Higher and Middle Classes in This Country, Contrasted with Real Christianity”).  In this book Wilberforce criticizes the notion of being a Christian in name only, but not in faith and practice.  I’m not yet finished with the book, so I can’t give a full review, but I did want to point out a helpful section where Wilberforce talks about vigor, exertion, and diligence in the Christian faith.  Basically, he rebukes those who say they are Christians but don’t put any effort into growing in knowledge, faith, and obedience.

“How criminal, then, must this voluntary ignorance of Christianity and the Word of God appear in the sight of God.  When God of His goodness has granted us such abundant means of instruction, how great must be the guilt, and how awful must be the punishment of voluntary ignorance.”

“And why are we to expect knowledge without inquiry and success without endeavor?  Bountiful as is the hand of Providence, it does not bestow its gifts to seduce us into laziness.  It bestows gifts to arouse us to exertion.  No one expects to attain to the heights of learning, or arts, or power, or wealth, or militant glory without vigorous resolution, strenuous diligence, and steady perseverance.”

“Yet we expect to be Christians without labor, study, or inquiry!  This is the more preposterous because Christianity, a revelation from God and not an invention of man, shows us new relations with their correspondent duties.  It contains also doctrines, motives, and precepts peculiar to itself.  We cannot reasonably expect to become proficient accidentally, as one might learn insensibly the maxims of worldly policy or a scheme of mere morals.

“…Scripture everywhere represents the Gospel by figures strongly calculated to impress on our minds a sense of its value.  It speaks of the Gospel as light from darkness, as release from prison, as deliverance from captivity, as life from death.  The early converts universally received it with thankfulness and joy.  At one time, the communication of it is promised as a reward.  At another, the loss of it is threatened as a punishment.  And the more general extension of the kingdom of Christ constitutes one of the  leading petitions of the short prayer taught by our blessed Savior.  What exalted conceptions of the importance of Christianity ought to fill us when we read these descriptions(!).”

William Wilberforce, Real Christianity, chapter 1.

shane lems
covenant presbyterian church (OPC)
hammond, wi

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7 comments on “Vigor, Exertion, Diligence, Faith

  1. Laura says:

    Thanks for sharing about this book. I have a copy I found in the Goodwill bins for about 25 cents. Have not read it yet, and your post has created interest for me. What a wordy original title!

  2. Truth2Freedom says:

    Reblogged this on Truth2Freedom's Blog.

  3. Ruben Cardenas says:

    I gotta read this. So good. Reminds me of a sermon John Piper did on Wilberforce a few years ago at a pastor’s conference (also excellent and well worth listening to).

  4. Laura/Ruben – I do hope you enjoy the book! In my edition the language is a bit archaic, but it is worth working through. Thanks for the comments, and blessings! shane

  5. […]  Two days ago I mentioned William Wilberforce’s book called Real Christianity (that’s the modern title for it anyway).  In chapter four he explains the true character of the real Christian life and then contrasts it with the beliefs and practices of nominal Christians.  The second section of this chapter is where Wilberforce describes how nominal Christians view the Christian religion.  Here are a few excerpts: […]

  6. […] Two days ago I mentioned William Wilberforce’s book called Real Christianity (that’s the modern title for it anyway).  In chapter four he explains the true character of the real Christian life and then contrasts it with the beliefs and practices of nominal Christians.  The second section of this chapter is where Wilberforce describes how nominal Christians view the Christian religion.  Here are a few excerpts: […]

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