Thomas Boston on the Law and the Christian

Marrow of Modern Divinity One of my favorite all-time books on justification, faith, law/gospel, and the covenants is Edward Fisher’s 1645 publication, The Marrow of Modern Divinity.  As some of you know, the Christian Focus reprint from 2009 includes Thomas Boston’s excellent commentary on Fisher’s writing.

Here’s how Boston summarizes Fisher’s discussion of the phrase, “you are not under the law” (Rom. 6:14).

“Concerning the deliverance from the law, which, according to the Scripture, is the privilege of believers purchased unto them by Jesus Christ, there are two opinions equally contrary to the word of God, and to one another.  The one of the Legalist, that believers are under the law, even as it is the covenant of works; the other of the Antinomian, that believers are not at all under the law, no, not as it is a rule of life.”

“Betwixt these extremes, both of them destructive of true holiness and gospel-obedience, our author [Fisher], with other orthodox divines, holds the middle path; asserting (and in the proper place proving) that believers are under the law, as a rule of life, but free from it as it is the covenant of works.  To be delivered from the law as it is the covenant of works, is no more but to be delivered from the covenant of works.  And the asserting, that believers are delivered from the law as it is a covenant of works, doth necessarily import, that they are under the law, in some other respects thereto contradistinguished.”

For confessional references, see WLC 97, WCF 19:6, and HC Q/A 86 and 113-115.

The above quotes are found on page 175 of Fisher’s Marrow of Modern Divinity

shane lems

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One comment on “Thomas Boston on the Law and the Christian

  1. […] Thomas Boston on the Law and the Christian (reformedreader.wordpress.com) To be delivered from the law as it is the covenant of works, is no more but to be delivered from the covenant of works.  And the asserting, that believers are delivered from the law as it is a covenant of works, doth necessarily import, that they are under the law, in some other respects thereto contradistinguished. […]

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